The Jacobs Center for Cosmetic Surgery

‘Tweaking’ in 2019: Cosmetic Changes Are Fair Game for All

Numbers show that throughout the United States, including the San Francisco Bay Area, plastic surgery and minimally invasive treatments are no longer the taboo subject they once were. Breast augmentation and BOTOX® are now everyday topics and considered part of the overall self-care conversation. Even hair restoration is a more commonly discussed subject, especially given the rise of nonsurgical NeoGraft hair transplants. Pharmaceutical industry leader Allergan’s 360 Aesthetics Report for 2019 states that more than 80 percent of worldwide consumers are willing to invest in their appearance.

While interest in surgical procedures continues to grow, the idea of “tweakment” has also begun to take shape. The convenience, lower cost, and lower barrier to entry of nonsurgical treatments has made them more appealing than ever to consumers not yet ready for the more dramatic results of surgery. With younger patients searching for more subtle, natural-looking results, “mini” facelifts—otherwise known as “temporal facelifts”—are on the rise, as are injectable fillers like Juvederm®. Likewise, non-invasive body contouring like CoolSculpting® has taken over clinics around the world.

On the surgical side, patients’ priorities when it comes to breast augmentation are also continuing to be refined, with customization now easier than ever before as anatomically shaped implants have become more versatile and widespread. New technological advances have introduced lighter silicone implants and more stable saline implants with internal dividers. To add to that, fat grafting allows for even more refined detail work.

Another emerging trend is the growing market for preventative cosmetic treatment among younger people, as an entire generation who grew up exposed to plastic surgery is now gaining economic leverage. The smartphone generation is using cosmetic treatments like injectables as a measure to delay or prevent the onset of common signs of aging.

To that end, 98 percent of people in the 21- to 35-year-old age range were open to having a facial injectable treatment within their lifetime, according to the Allergan report. The demand is both career-driven (in an increasingly competitive, fickle business landscape, aesthetically conscious millennials seek to make themselves stand out among peers) and a result of the pressure placed on them to look physically attractive on social media.

To discover more about plastic surgery and nonsurgical treatments, reach The Jacobs Center For Cosmetic Surgery’s San Francisco office directly at 415.433.0303, or fill out an online form.